Bribie islander Beach Report

Tags: . Bellara. Banksia . Bongaree. Moreton Bay.

As winter approaches the beach sand will erode making a rough rollercoaster-like ride, so be careful, unsecured objects become airborne. Beach passing road rules are the same as for any other road. Stick to the left, indicate when overtaking and slow down on approach. If you need to change tracks your wheels may get stuck in the track causing your vehicle not steer out or to move erratically, you must allow time to regain control when passing. After the recent rain, Norfolk lagoon is one lagoon again, having been previously cut in two by dropping water levels.

Watch your speed, kids are on the beach, observe the 30km and 50km speed zones, speeding is treated the same as on any other road. Drive carefully on the inland track the soft sand has now become mud in places, don’t venture off into side tracks. If you get bogged there, no one will know where to find you, except our rangers who won’t be happy. While I’m on that subject, please leave your dog at home as there are plenty of signs and fines are hefty. Fort (RAN2) is well worth a visit. It was built to play a major roll in the Defence of Australia.

Built only 18 months after the bombing of Pearl Harbour, in expectation of a northern invasion, the 6” guns at Fort Bribie came off the HMAS Sydney (ex WW1). Fort Bribie formed part of the Brisbane Line that went across to Adelaide. It protected the Port of Brisbane that housed the Newstead reach submarine base. The Navy controlled Fort Bribie included mine control huts that boasted a Detector Loop to identify ship movements. Used in conjunction with a string of sea mines, deployed across the shipping channel at Fort Bribie, it was ready, willing and able.

The sea mines were the same as the mine on display outside the “Gateway Bribie Adventures bait n tackle shop at Ningi. The question for locals that has been the cause of spirited debate over the years, was there a field hospital on Bribie or a POW interrogation centre? Is the jury still out? In front of the Fort Bribie 150 meters of beach dune has eroded in 77 years since 1942 is a section is still one kilometre wide.

Last Issue’s Reader Question:

How did our lagoons get named?

Was it Matthew Flinders who landed on Bribie in 1799, 220 years ago this year, he named the township of Bongaree/ Bungaree after Flinders’ Aboriginal companion?

Was it John Oxley who landed on Bribie in 1823 meeting shipwrecked convict Thomas Pamphlett?

Was it a convict from the Moreton Bay Penal Colony named “Bribie” who earned his freedom via graft and corruption, catching mud crabs, a free feed for the Penal Colony officers, who set him free, he later married his aboriginal sweet heart.

So who named them? Norfolk and Mermaid were after ships, whilst Welsby was after Thomas Welsby MLA a member of the Legislative Assembly and last Freshwater creek was a location where freshwater was available.

This Issue’s Reader Question:

Did you know Bribie was the site of an Atomic Clock during the cold war, from which nuclear Submarines took their navigational bearings, do you know where it was? Observe a few things and enjoy our wonderful National Park.

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