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The Bribie Islander Gloss Magazine February 9, 2024 Issue 208

Issue 208 OUT NOW. Get all your community news and information. Bribie Islands only community gloss magazine NOW EVERY TWO WEEKS! – Articles on boating, camping, fishing, life, drama, travel destinations, sports, and what to see and do on Bribie Island. Covering charities, organizations, places, children’s activities, arts and crafts, tourist destinations, heritage parks, technology, science, music, gardening, and much more.

Download latest digital edition here.

Choc Raspberry Ripple Wreath

Ingredients
900 ml Western Star Thickened Cream
2x 250 g packets of Chocolate ripple biscuits
3/4 cup raspberry jam
Cherries, raspberries and blueberries, to serve

Method
Pour 600 ml of Western Star Thickened Cream into the bowl of an electric mixer and whisk until stiff peaks form. Alternatively use a large bowl and whisk by hand.
Spread 1 side of each biscuit with 1 teaspoon of jam followed by 2 tablespoons of whipped cream and stand upright onto a round serving plate. Sandwich with another biscuit spread with jam and cream. Repeat until you have a row of 5 biscuits.
Repeat with remaining biscuits, jam and cream until there are 7 rows of biscuits arranged around the edge of the plate to form a wreath shape.

Banoffee Biscuit Balls

Ingredients
200 g wheat biscuits, extra crushed biscuits
for topping
1/4 cup caramel
1 medium ripe banana, peeled
100 g dark chocolate, melted (optional)

Method
Add the biscuits, caramel and banana in a food processor and pulse until biscuits are crushed and mixture comes together. Using clean hands and a tablespoon measure, form the mixture into balls and place on a lined tray. Roll each ball in the extra crushed wheat biscuits and refrigerate for 15-20 minutes until firm. Alternatively, if using chocolate, dip each ball in the melted chocolate and let it set over a wire rack.

Bribie Island RSL Sub-Branch

The Bribie Island RSL Sub-Branch Remembrance Day Service commemorating the 105th anniversary of the signing of the Armistice was held, as usual, on the grounds of the Bribie RSL. Morning showers and the threat of more rain did not affect the crowd numbers, which appeared to be normal. The Catafalque Party was provided by B Squadron, 12/16th Hunter Rivers Lancers. The Bribie Island Men’s Shed placed their “Ghost Soldiers” to form a guard of honour for the mounting of the Catafalque Party. The Banksia Beach State School provided the music for the service, plus the three young trumpeters who played the Last Post. The band from Banksia Beach State School performed the Australian and New Zealand National Anthems. The Bribie Island State School choir sang hymns.

The attached photographs show the Catafalque Party marching through the “Ghost Soldiers” guard and the two rows of “Ghost Soldiers” leading to the dais.

Time to Declutter?

Recently, I had to move, and those who know me know I am constantly getting rid of things. My mother often asks have you got anything left to get rid of? I always laugh and say, yes, I still have a few things. At a glance, it looked like I did not have a lot; friends often commented how my place had a lot of space; I think what they meant was my place looked rather sparse, and it appeared I had minimal…

I thought that too and liked it that way… well, that was until I started packing. Boy, was I surprised about how much stuff I had lurking in the cupboards! I realised like many of us, I have more than what I need. Most have a hard time admitting we have too much stuff, though the moment of truth comes when we come to move. It is then we find out what we really have gathered around the home. So, how do we really define what we need? Here are some strategies to start emptying your space:

  • When did you last use it?
  • What does it cost, and how easy is it to replace?
  • What does it cost to move or store it?
  • Does the item evoke good, happy memories or sad ones?
  • Do you need it, really want it, or love it?
  • How much do you want to have freedom from your stuff?
  • What is the reason for keeping it?
  • Are you procrastinating or delaying deciding regarding a particular item?
  • Can you gift it to someone who may use it?

My favourite question is, does this represent who I am today, and would I buy it today, being the person I am? Whilst it can be hard to answer some of these questions, it is important to focus on the goal of wanting to live with less. Not only does it take less time when it comes to moving, but it can save us a lot of time and energy by not having to clean, maintain, or repair the things we do not really need, as well as saving time going through things.

Material things offer short-term happiness in this journey called life. Happiness does not come from what you have; it is something within you. Real happiness is having nothing and feeling full.

If you want more happiness in your life or are looking at setting some goals, and want some help in achieving them, reach out and give me a call. I can help you work out how to obtain your aspirations, whether it is decluttering, releasing weight, or a new life direction.

Always with love, Maria Christina FB: MariaChristina.
Love or 0405 361 882

The Bribie Islander Gloss Magazine December 15, 2023 Issue 206

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Issue 206 OUT NOW. Get all your community news and information. Bribie Islands only community gloss magazine NOW EVERY TWO WEEKS! – Articles on boating, camping, fishing, life, drama, travel destinations, sports, and what to see and do on Bribie Island. Covering charities, organizations, places, children’s activities, arts and crafts, tourist destinations, heritage parks, technology, science, music, gardening, and much more.

Download latest digital edition here.

The Bribie Islander Gloss Magazine December 1, 2023 Issue 205

Issue 205 OUT NOW. Get all your community news and information. Bribie Islands only community gloss magazine NOW EVERY TWO WEEKS! – Articles on boating, camping, fishing, life, drama, travel destinations, sports, and what to see and do on Bribie Island. Covering charities, organizations, places, children’s activities, arts and crafts, tourist destinations, heritage parks, technology, science, music, gardening, and much more.

Download latest digital edition here.

The Bribie Islander Gloss Magazine November 17, 2023 Issue 204

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Issue 204 OUT NOW. Get all your community news and information. Bribie Islands only community gloss magazine NOW EVERY TWO WEEKS! – Articles on boating, camping, fishing, life, drama, travel destinations, sports, and what to see and do on Bribie Island. Covering charities, organizations, places, children’s activities, arts and crafts, tourist destinations, heritage parks, technology, science, music, gardening, and much more.

Download latest digital edition here.

The Bribie Islander Gloss Magazine November 3, 2023 Issue 203

Issue 203 OUT NOW. Get all your community news and information. Bribie Islands only community gloss magazine NOW EVERY TWO WEEKS! – Articles on boating, camping, fishing, life, drama, travel destinations, sports, and what to see and do on Bribie Island. Covering charities, organizations, places, children’s activities, arts and crafts, tourist destinations, heritage parks, technology, science, music, gardening, and much more.

Download latest digital edition here.

The Bribie Islander Gloss Magazine October 20, 2023 Issue 202

Issue 202 OUT NOW. Get all your community news and information. Bribie Islands only community gloss magazine NOW EVERY TWO WEEKS! – Articles on boating, camping, fishing, life, drama, travel destinations, sports, and what to see and do on Bribie Island. Covering charities, organizations, places, children’s activities, arts and crafts, tourist destinations, heritage parks, technology, science, music, gardening, and much more.

Download latest digital edition here.

The Bribie Islander Gloss Magazine October 6, 2023 Issue 201

Issue 201 OUT NOW. Get all your community news and information. Bribie Islands only community gloss magazine NOW EVERY TWO WEEKS! – Articles on boating, camping, fishing, life, drama, travel destinations, sports, and what to see and do on Bribie Island. Covering charities, organizations, places, children’s activities, arts and crafts, tourist destinations, heritage parks, technology, science, music, gardening, and much more.

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LOOK MUM – NO FEET. – David Horrocks

All cars have pedals. Every driver knows that, and once they learn to drive, they promptly forget about them. But they are important, very important. There are either two or three in the vast majority of autos; even the new ‘sparkies’ (electric models) have them. For this little exercise, we are only interested in the two right-hand side ones. If the third pedal is present, it doesn’t come into play in the following dissertation.

Now, of important note here is that every time you push down with your foot onto one of the primarily rubber-coated devices, it’s costing you money and the harder you push, the more money you’re parting with. Environmental concerns are also at play, especially if you are green-inclined. If that’s of importance to you, well, again, the more often you push and the more vigorous the application, the more you pollute. See, you don’t have to spend millions on a new ‘Sparkie’ to help save the world; modify your actions.

The car will proceed if you don’t have a foot on a pedal – uh! That’s what is called ‘coasting’ or ‘freewheeling’. Note the term ‘free’ because although it is not completely free travel, it is as near as you can get in this world. In the days of old, some cars had a control on the dashboard marked ‘free wheel’. I once travelled in, I think, a 1948 model Rover so equipped. By turning this knob, you engaged or disengaged this facility; a modern car we have just acquired has this feature, but it works automatically – no fancy knob these days – all done with electronics now.

The two pedals we are talking about are the accelerator (the ‘go’ pedal) and the brake (the ‘wo’ pedal). If, whilst moving along, you take your tootsies off both and just concentrate on the steering, you will still proceed, albeit at a slowing pace. Now if you put thought into this ability, you can save the planet (a bit), but more importantly, you can save cash – why? All the time you are pushing the go pedal, you are pumping fuel into the engine, and the harder you push, the more you pump. You may have noticed that especially of late, this fuel stuff doesn’t come cheap, so it’s worth thinking about all this, unless you’re super rich of course.

The same thing applies when you push the ‘wo’ pedal. In this case, your pushing makes some items like brake pads or linings start to ‘wear’ by pushing them onto items made from steel, a substance that doesn’t wear, at least not very much anyway. This activity on your part causes friction that effectively slows down the car. The energy displaced goes into heat – don’t put your hand onto the inner wheel area of your car; if you’ve driven and stopped a lot, it might hurt! These ‘wearing bits’, often called ‘sacrificial elements’ by engineers – get the idea – they ‘sacrifice’ themselves to achieve a result – a lot like mothers do with kids. Again, the harder you push, the more the wear occurs, so the nearer you get to receiving a bill for the repair work to replace them; again, if you’re mega-rich go read another article.

Now, how do you get to win out with this ‘freewheeling’? Well, if you do what a lot of folks do and drive always with a foot on either pedal so that you push the ‘go’ right up until the instant you push the ‘wo’ pedal, then you’re a loser. If you’re a thinker and a winner, look ahead of the car, way ahead, and what’s going on a distance ahead. If you see a roundabout, a red light, or a build-up of traffic, then lift your size nine off the ‘go’ and rest it on the floor as the car still runs ahead but slows, getting ready to handle the coming obstruction. Be alert and ready to apply the ‘wo’ if something unexpected happens.

Now there’s a side effect to saving dosh and saving the planet (a bit). If you put mental effort into planning ahead with your car control, it keeps your mind on driving and away from the myriad of other worries in your life. Tell a lie here and swear that you never let your mind wander as you drive and sometimes can’t remember how you got to where you are right now. I’ll tell a truth and admit that when I was working and was trying to make the world a better place (that’s maybe a little exaggeration, but I’m writing this, so let’s call it poetic license), I often drove halfway to work with no recollection of the journey. Now if you believe the boys and girls in blue, it’s speed that kills. I reckon that it’s inattention; if it is speed, then why is there not mayhem on the German autobahns? I’ve been in the Fatherland and driven at over 180kph – it’s exhilarating to drive at very high speeds and believe me, your mind is so alert you notice everything.

The other thing is that it’s fun to see how accurate you can become at judging distances and seeing how your ability improves over time. You don’t get bored, frustrated or agro when using your skill to smooth the way. Aeons ago, when I lived in NSW and travelled very often to visit a business friend in ACT – a boring drive before the advent of motorways the friend who also made the same journey, and I had a competition to ease the boredom. We competed by noting the moment we passed the Liverpool highway sign and the moment we entered ACT at the border. The competition needed sportsmanlike honesty (that did exist in those far-off days) to declare how few times you touched the brake pedal over the journey. To take part in the game you had to be on full alert all the time. It was amazing how successful you could become.

Drive safe, save money and maybe the planet (a bit).

FISHING REPORT – September 22, 2023

Sand Whiting has been the most targeted fish this month, with lots of anglers managing to find a feed. Blood worms, yabbies, squid, and prawns are working well. Favourite land base spots have been Red Beach, Skirmish Point, in front of IGA, Sandstone Point Flats, Turner Camp Road and White Patch. Fishing the run-up tide has worked best from low to high as the whiting work their way up the banks following the tide. Boat anglers drifting Lime Pocket, Red Beach and in 8 to 9 meters depth of Woorim are also coming back with good catches. Light lines 4 to 6lb on whippy rods are the favourite. QLD rules allow 30 limit and a minimum of 23cm long, Tailor schools have been smaller than usual this time of the year, I believe the lack of rain has been the main reason, the bait hasn’t entered the passage hardy heads being the primary target for tailor and snapper.

Instead, we have extra-large tailor in small schools chasing mullet and whiting which is a great trade-off, A lot of Tailors are lost at the boat as they are just too powerful to muscle into the boat. Recommend upsizing the line to 30lb to have a chase of landing these brutes. Snapper is late coming into the passage but again without the bait in the passage, the snapper are feeding out in the bay, With good catches being reported around Moreton, Mud and Peel Island. Bongaree Jetty has seen many fish species caught, and always a surprise what can be landed in the Michael and I managing 70cm plus Flathead land base, ganged or Snell pilchards and squid work well. I love the Double Clutch when working the sand bars. Flathead has been a bit quiet, with mainly bigger units around. The low tide seems to be working best. QLD 2.0 rules for Dusty Flathead are a minimum size of 40cm with a Maximum size of 75cm with flathead growing to 1.3 meters, 5 Possession Limit. middle of the day. Mick caught and landed a 75cm Mulloway off the jetty. Great Catch.